Justin Bailey

a website by Justin Bailey

Sports       Welcome to my sports page! I really only follow two different sports, baseball and football. Baseball would have to be my favorite sport as I played baseball from t-ball all the way through the military. Football would be my second favorite sport as it begins towards the end of baseball season and sort of fills the hole inbetween. So without further delay, let me introduce you to my favorite teams and some of my favorite athletes...

Baseball



Boston Red Sox      Growing up in Virginia we has no professional sports teams. At the time, the closest baseball team to us was the Baltimore Orioles. My dad quickly brain washed me at a young age and dressed me in Baltimor gear. At the time, he was all about Cal Ripken Jr. and Ripken was in his prime and breaking records. Once I was old enough to make a decision on my own, my dad and I were watching an Orioles game and they were playing the Boston Red Sox. As the camera man panned over to the Red Sox infield to the first base side, I saw a monsterous African American first baseman (Mo Vaughan). It was at that point in time that I said "Dad, you see that guy on first base for the Red Sox? I like that guy, the Red Sox are my favorite team now!". My dad, clearly shocked and defeated, knew the time had come that I was able to make a decision for myself and accepted that from that point on, I was going to be a Boston Red Sox fan. I watched and listened loyaly and became a member of a team that was "cursed". For years I watched the Yankees beat Boston out of the division and the playoffs crushing my dream of seeing my team win a wolrd series. Then it eventually all came to a close when Boston pulled off the impossible and came back from 3 games down to beat the Yankees in the playoffs and went on to win the World Series in 2004! Since then they have went on to win a couple more and I have been excited to watch the Sox evolve as a team and remain a competitor throughout the years. Go Sox!

     

Football



Patriots      As being an avid baseball fan first, at a young age I was a Dolphins fan, cheering on Dan Marino. But that quickly faded as Marino retired an I actually lost interest in football all together. The interest however was renewed when my patriotism for our great country was renewed. Being a Boston fan I quickly adopted the New England Patriots as my favorite football team, still at a young age. Brady wasn't even heard of at the time and Drew Bledsoe had recently become the Quaterback of the team. They we're good but they weren't great so I wasn't jumping on any bandwagon, besides, the main two reasons I adopted the Patriots as my football team was out of the name of the team "Patriots" and my patriotic support for our country (I went on to serve in the military) and the fact that they we're the closest football team to the Boston Red Sox. Sine becoming a Patriots fan I have had the pleasure of watching the beginning of the greatest player to ever play the game in Tomy Brady from his rookie year until now and watching his lead the team to many superbowl championship victories as well as his own record accomplishments. It has been quite a ride and I look forward to the furture with the Patriots!




Some of my favorite athletes

Here I will list some of my favorite athletes (both past and present) that I have had the privledge of watching play throughout the years (or just love for what they brought to the game)and have become some of my favorite athletes on some of my favorite teams to watch play. They have skills, talent, class, and above all hold a high level of respect from other athletes in the realm of sports.


Dustin Pedroia

Dustin Pedroia Dustin Luis Pedroia (born August 17, 1983) is an American baseball second baseman for the Boston Red Sox of Major League Baseball (MLB). He is a four-time All-Star and an American League (AL) Most Valuable Player award winner, who has also received four Gold Glove Awards and a single Silver Slugger award.

Pedroia was drafted by the Red Sox in 2004, and made his major league debut in 2006, playing in 31 games. He became a full-time player in 2007, winning the AL Rookie of the Year award. He was a member of the Red Sox World Series championship teams in 2007 and 2013. Since the retirement of David Ortiz at the end of the 2016 season, Pedroia is the only player from the 2007 World Series team still with the club, and the longest tenured player on the Red Sox' roster. Pedroia remains under contract with the Red Sox through the 2021 season.

Dustin Pedroia's Stats and bio from MLB.com



Pedro Martinez

Pedro Martinez Pedro Jaime Martínez (born October 25, 1971) is a Dominican–American former starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for five teams from 1992 to 2009, most notably the Boston Red Sox from 1998 to 2004. From 2002 to 2006 he held the major league record for the highest career winning percentage by a pitcher with at least 200 decisions; with a final record of 219 wins and 100 losses, he retired with the fourth-highest percentage in history, and the highest by a right-hander since the modern pitching era began in 1893. He ended his career with an earned run average (ERA) of 2.93, the sixth-lowest by a pitcher with at least 2,500 innings pitched since 1920. Martínez reached the 3,000 strikeout mark in fewer innings than any pitcher except Randy Johnson, and is the only pitcher to compile over 3,000 strikeouts with fewer than 3,000 innings pitched; his career strikeout rate of 10.04 per 9 innings trails only Johnson (10.61) among pitchers with over 1,500 innings.

An eight-time All-Star, Martínez was at his peak in the years from 1997 to 2003, establishing himself as one of the most dominant pitchers in history. He won three Cy Young Awards (1997, 1999, 2000) and was runner-up twice (1998, 2002), posting a cumulative record of 118–36 (.766) with a 2.20 ERA while leading his league in ERA five times and in winning percentage and strikeouts three times each. In 1999 he was runner-up for the American League (AL) Most Valuable Player Award after winning the pitching Triple Crown with a 23–4 record, 2.07 ERA and 313 strikeouts, and – along with Johnson – joined Gaylord Perry in the rare feat of winning the Cy Young Award in both the American and National Leagues (a feat since accomplished by Roger Clemens, Roy Halladay, and Max Scherzer). He is also the record holder for the lowest single-season WHIP in major league history (0.737 in 2000), and is the record holder for the lowest single-season Fielding Independent Pitching (FIP) in the live ball era (1.39 in 1999). Although his performance suffered a steep decline in 2004, he ended the season memorably by helping the Red Sox end a long drought in winning their first World Series title in 86 years.

Pedro Martinez's Stats and bio from MLB.com



Ted Williams

Ted Williams Theodore Samuel "Ted" Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002) was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played his entire 19-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career as a left fielder for the Boston Red Sox from 1939 to 1960, only interrupted by service time during World War II and the Korean War. Nicknamed "The Kid", "The Splendid Splinter", "Teddy Ballgame", "The Thumper", and "The Greatest Hitter Who Ever Lived", Williams is regarded as one of the greatest players in baseball history, despite being a below average defensive left fielder. Williams was a nineteen-time All-Star, a two-time recipient of the American League (AL) Most Valuable Player Award, a six-time AL batting champion, and a two-time Triple Crown winner. He finished his playing career with a .344 batting average, 521 home runs, and a .482 on-base percentage, the highest of all time. His career batting average is the highest of any MLB player whose career was played primarily in the live-ball era, and ranks tied for 7th all-time (with Billy Hamilton).

Born and raised in San Diego, Williams played baseball throughout his youth. Joining the Red Sox in 1939, he immediately emerged as one of the sport's best hitters. In 1941, Williams posted a .406 batting average, making him the last MLB player to bat over .400 in a season. He followed this up by winning his first Triple Crown in 1942. Williams interrupted his baseball career in 1943 to serve three years in the United States Navy and Marine Corps during World War II. Upon returning to MLB in 1946, Williams won his first AL MVP Award and played in his only World Series. In 1947, he won his second Triple Crown. Williams was returned to active military duty for portions of the 1952 and 1953 seasons to serve as a Marine combat aviator in the Korean War. In 1957 and 1958 at the ages of 39 and 40, respectively, he was the AL batting champion for the fifth and sixth time.

Williams retired from playing in 1960. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966, in his first year of eligibility.[2] Williams managed the Washington Senators/Texas Rangers franchise from 1969 to 1972. An avid sport fisherman, he hosted a television program about fishing, and was inducted into the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame. Williams' involvement in the Jimmy Fund helped raise millions in dollars for cancer care and research. In 1991 President George H. W. Bush presented Williams with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award bestowed by the United States government. He was selected for the Major League Baseball All-Time Team in 1997 and the Major League Baseball All-Century Team in 1999.

Ted William's Stats and bio from MLB.com



Chris Sale

Chris Sale Christopher Allen Sale (born March 30, 1989), nicknamed The Condor, is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Boston Red Sox of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played in MLB for the Chicago White Sox, with whom he made his major league debut on August 6, 2010. As a power pitcher, Sale excels at achieving high numbers of strikeouts, and has set a number of strikeout-related records. He bats and throws left-handed, stands 6 feet 6 inches (1.98 m), and weighs 180 pounds (82 kg).

A seven-time MLB All-Star consecutively from 2012–2018, Sale is a two-time American League (AL) leader in strikeouts, including in 2015 and 2017. As of 2017, he is MLB's career leader in strikeout-to-walk ratio (5.12), and reached 1,500 strikeouts in the fewest innings pitched (1,290). After reaching 300 strikeouts in a single season for the first time in 2017, he was selected as the AL Sporting News Starting Pitcher of the Year. Although he has yet to win a Cy Young Award, in each of his All-Star seasons, he has placed in the top six.

A native of Lakeland, Florida, located within the Tampa Bay Area, Sale played college baseball for Florida Gulf Coast University. The Chicago White Sox selected him 13th overall in the 2010 amateur draft. He is currently under contract through 2018 with an option for 2019.

Chris Sale's Stats and bio from MLB.com



Curt Schilling

Curt Schilling Curtis Montague Schilling (born November 14, 1966) is an American former Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher, former video game developer, and former baseball color analyst. He helped lead the Philadelphia Phillies to the World Series in 1993, and won championships in 2001 with the Arizona Diamondbacks and in 2004 and 2007 with the Boston Red Sox. Schilling retired with a career postseason record of 11–2, and his .846 postseason winning percentage is a major-league record among pitchers with at least ten decisions. He is a member of the 3,000-strikeout club and has the highest strikeout-to-walk ratio of any of its members. He is tied for third for the most 300-strikeout seasons. Of post 19th century pitchers, Schilling has the second highest JAWS of any pitcher not in the Hall of Fame (behind only Roger Clemens).

After retiring, he founded Green Monster Games, which was renamed 38 Studios. The company released Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning in February 2012. Three months later, Schilling laid off his entire staff amid severe financial troubles.

As a radio-personality Schilling was signed by the Howie Carr radio network to do a Saturday morning politics and sports show. An outspoken conservative, Schilling joined the website Breitbart.com in 2016.

Curt Schilling's Stats and bio from MLB.com



Nomar Garciaparra

Nomar Garciaparra Anthony Nomar Garciaparra born July 23, 1973) is an American retired Major League Baseball player and current SportsNet LA analyst. After playing parts of nine seasons as an All-Star shortstop for the Boston Red Sox, he played third base and first base for the Chicago Cubs, Los Angeles Dodgers, and the Oakland Athletics. He is one of 13 players in Major League history to hit two grand slams during a single game, and the only player to achieve the feat at his home stadium.

Garciaparra is a six-time All-Star (1997, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2006), and was the AL Rookie of the Year and AL Silver Slugger Award winner at shortstop in 1997. In 2001, he suffered a wrist injury, the first in a series of significant injuries that plagued the remainder of his career. Known for his ability to hit for average, Garciaparra is a lifetime .313 hitter. He had the highest single-season batting average by a right handed batter in the post-war era, batting .372 in 2000, and was the first right handed batter to win the AL Batting Title in consecutive seasons since Joe DiMaggio, when he accomplished the feat in 1999 and 2000.

Nomar Garciaparra's Stats and bio from MLB.com



Clayton Kershaw

Clayton Kershaw Clayton Edward Kershaw (born March 19, 1988) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). A left-handed starting pitcher, Kershaw has played in the major leagues since 2008, and his career earned run average (ERA) and walks and hits per innings pitched average (WHIP) are the lowest among starters in the live-ball era with a minimum of 1,000 innings pitched. Kershaw has a career hits allowed per nine innings pitched average of 6.61—the second-lowest in MLB history—along with three Cy Young Awards and the 2014 National League Most Valuable Player Award. He has been described throughout the majority of his career as the best pitcher in baseball.

Kershaw was drafted seventh overall in the 2006 MLB draft. He worked his way through the Dodgers' farm system in just one full season, and reached the majors at 20 years old. When he debuted in 2008, he was the youngest player in MLB, a title he held for one full year. In 2011, he won the pitching Triple Crown and the National League Cy Young Award, becoming the youngest pitcher to accomplish either of these feats since Dwight Gooden in 1985. Kershaw pitched a no-hitter on June 18, 2014, becoming the 22nd Dodger to do so. Being a left-handed strikeout pitcher and playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Kershaw has often been compared to Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax. He became the first pitcher in history to lead MLB in ERA for four consecutive years when he did so in the 2011 through 2014 seasons.

Off the field, Kershaw is an active participant in volunteer work. He and his wife, Ellen, launched "Kershaw's Challenge" and wrote the book Arise to raise money to build an orphanage in Zambia. He has been honored with the Roberto Clemente Award and the Branch Rickey Award for his humanitarian work.

Clayton Kershaw's Stats and bio from MLB.com



Tom Brady

Tom Brady Thomas Edward Patrick Brady Jr. (born August 3, 1977) is an American football quarterback for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). He is one of only two players to win five Super Bowls (the other being defensive player Charles Haley) and the only player to win them all playing for one team.

After playing college football for the University of Michigan, Brady was drafted by the Patriots in the sixth round of the 2000 NFL Draft. Due to his late draft selection, Brady is considered to be the biggest "steal" in the history of the NFL Draft. In Brady's 16 seasons as a starter,[a] he has quarterbacked the Patriots to eight Super Bowl appearances, the most for any player in history.

Brady has been honored with four Super Bowl MVP awards (Super Bowl XXXVI, XXXVIII, XLIX, and LI), the most ever by a single player, has won three league MVP awards (2007, 2010, 2017), has been selected to 13 Pro Bowls, and has led his team to more division titles (15) than any other quarterback in NFL history. As of the end of the 2017 regular season, Brady is fourth all-time in total career passing yards, tied for third (with Drew Brees) in career touchdown passes, and third in career passer rating. His career postseason record is 27–10, winning more playoff games than any other quarterback, and he has appeared in more playoff games than any player at any position. Brady has never had a losing season as a starting quarterback in the NFL. His combined regular-season and postseason wins are also the most of any quarterback in NFL history. Brady also holds the record of being the oldest player to win the Super Bowl MVP at 39 years of age, and the oldest player to win the regular season MVP at the age of 40. Because of his numerous accomplishments and accolades, many analysts and sportswriters consider Brady to be among the greatest quarterbacks of all time.

Tom Brady's Stats and bio from NFL.com



Julian Edelman

Julian Edelman Julian Francis Edelman (born May 22, 1986) is an American football wide receiver and punt returner for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Kent State and the College of San Mateo as a quarterback, and was drafted by the Patriots in the seventh round of the 2009 NFL Draft. He won Super Bowl XLIX and Super Bowl LI with the Patriots. Edelman primarily plays in the slot on offense, and has also been pressed into service as a cornerback at times when the Patriots have been shorthanded on defense. He was sidelined with an ACL injury for the entire 2017 season.

Julian Edelman's Stats and bio from NFL.com



Jimmy Garoppolo

Jimmy Garoppolo James Richard Garoppolo (born November 2, 1991) is an American football quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Eastern Illinois and was drafted in the second round of the 2014 NFL Draft by the New England Patriots, with whom he won two Super Bowls as the backup to Tom Brady.

As a senior in 2013, Garoppolo broke Tony Romo's school records for career passing touchdowns, career passing yards, and passing touchdowns in a season. That season, he also won the Walter Payton Award as the best offensive player in the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS).

Garoppolo saw light duty behind Brady in his seasons in New England. In October 2017, Garoppolo was traded by the Patriots to the 49ers. He won his first five starts with his new team as quarterback, which, including his two victorious starts for New England, earned him a 7–0 record as a starter, a feat last accomplished by Ben Roethlisberger in 2004. Garoppolo signed a lucrative, record-breaking five-year contract with the 49ers in February 2018.

Jimmy Garoppolo's Stats and bio from NFL.com



Dan Marino

Dan Marino Daniel Constantine Marino Jr. (born September 15, 1961) is a former American football quarterback who played seventeen seasons for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). The last quarterback of the quarterback class of 1983 to be taken in the first round, Marino held or currently holds dozens of NFL records associated with the quarterback position. Despite never being on a Super Bowl-winning team, he is recognized as one of the greatest quarterbacks in American football history.

Best remembered for his quick release and powerful arm, Marino helped the Dolphins become consistent postseason contenders, leading them to the playoffs ten times and one Super Bowl appearance in XIX, although a title victory ultimately eluded him during his career. Marino is considered by many to be one of the greatest players to never win a Super Bowl and has the most career victories of quarterbacks to not win a title at 155. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2005.

Dan Marino's Stats and bio from NFL.com





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